Space Updates

Space plays a big role in your daily life. The day’s weather forecast, your cell phone calls, and the men and women in uniform fighting for our freedom, all heavily rely on our capabilities in space.  Our lives have been improved by technologies developed for NASA missions and research done by astronauts in space.

The United States is the preeminent spacefaring nation. NASA got us to the Moon, and we are still the only nation to land humans there. Our commercial space industry has become adept at launching rockets, building satellites, and will soon begin transporting humans to and from space. To ensure our country remains the leader in space, we need to change government processes and further leverage the innovation coming from the commercial sector. This will free up government resources to focus on the things that will take a national effort, such as getting Americans to Mars.

As a Member of Congress, I am working to ensure that space can continue to contribute to and improve your quality of life. This blog will keep you up-to-date with my latest work on space issues. Please visit SpaceRenaissanceAct.com for more detailed information and the ASRA bill text.


Bridenstine introduces American Space Renaissance Act

image description

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — A sweeping space policy bill introduced April 12 seeks to update a wide range of civil, commercial and national security space issues to keep the United States competitive. Rep. James Bridenstine (R-Okla.) formally introduced the American Space Renaissance Act in a speech at the 32nd Space Symposium here, arguing that the bill’s updates to national space policy are critical in a changing environment that threatens the country’s economic and military security. “Friends, ...

Why Congress’s newest space advocate says the U.S. faces a ‘Sputnik moment’

image description

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — For a politician, there’s not a lot to gain in space. Voters tend care more about taxes, health care and immigration than issues as abstract as who’s monitoring the debris in space. But Rep. Jim Bridenstine thinks a lot about space debris — and space in general: how all that traffic up there should be managed, how wars would be fought in space, how we might get to Mars. He’s not some far out, cosmic hippy type with a collection of funky space ties, even if he was the ex...

Draft bill proposes wide-ranging space policy changes

image description

A draft version of a comprehensive space policy bill seeks to make changes to the management and regulation of space activities at NASA, the Defense Department, and other federal agencies while pushing the government to rely more on commercial capabilities. A draft copy of the American Space Renaissance Act, sponsored by Rep. James Bridenstine (R-Okla.), runs nearly 100 pages and includes sections that address national security, civil and commercial space policy. Bridenstine’s office is circulat...

Bridenstine to introduce space policy bill in April

image description

WASHINGTON — Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla.) said Feb. 26 he plans to introduce a wide-ranging space policy bill in April, but acknowledges that the full bill is unlikely to pass this year. Speaking at a Commercial Spaceflight Federation breakfast here, Bridenstine said he will circulate a draft of his proposed American Space Renaissance Act with industry in the next few weeks. He will then formally introduce the bill during the 32nd Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado, in April. “The o...

Space is a new frontier, and so are the laws governing it

image description

The idea of a company exploring for commercial reasons is nothing new. While exploration has always been conducted to satisfy human curiosity, it has almost always had an economic rationale as well. Think of the Hudson’s Bay Company in Canada, Jamestown in Virginia, the East India Company in India or the Norwegian whaling expeditions in the Antarctic. These all were done for commerce as well as adventure. Even the Lewis and Clark Expedition — arguably the greatest officially authorized expeditio...

U.S. Air Force taking closer look at buying commercial weather data

image description

WASHINGTON — As the U.S. Air Force develops a long-term weather satellite strategy, the service also is considering using commercial weather data to meet gaps in its forecasting capabilities. In a request for information posted to the Federal Business Opportunities website in late December, the Air Force said it was looking for white papers that would describe industry’s “long-term interest in providing weather data as a commercial service, utilizing currently available or projected on-orbit wea...

New Bill Could Shift Space Tracking Away From DoD

image description

WASHINGTON — One of Capitol Hill’s most active lawmakers on space issues is planning to unveil a space reform bill this spring that could shift responsibility for tracking objects in orbit away from the Defense Department. In a Jan. 15 interview with Defense News, Rep. Jim Bridenstine, R-Okla., offered details on the American Space Renaissance Act, which he plans to roll out during the Space Foundation’s annual Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado, in April. The bill may eventually incl...

Bridenstine Planning Broad Space Reform Bill

image description

WASHINGTON – U.S. Rep. Jim Bridenstine (R-Okla.) and House staffers have spent months drafting what they envision as a wide-reaching reform bill that would change how the Defense Department and NASA approach space acquisitions and operations. The legislation, which will be known as the American Space Renaissance Act and would serve as a kind of clearinghouse of reforms, has been whispered about between lawmakers, staff members and industry officials for several months. Bridenstine formally discu...

Make FAA/AST the "FAA for Space"

image description

The Commercial Space Launch Competitiveness Act (CSLCA) represents a tremendous achievement for American space leadership. This legislation will enable the continued growth of the commercial space sector by allowing innovation and expanded access to space, making this a truly exciting time for commercial space. Worryingly, a 2013 study by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee determined that even if nothing new is launched, debris in orbit will continue to grow due to collisions, ...